RYMMAI 1

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RIVER/STREAM: WAH UMLWAI
LENGTH: 18.5 m
WIDTH AT CP: .7 m
HEIGHT AT CP: 3.5 m
GPS: N25.29749 E91.77993
ALTITUDE: 483 m
SR: 1
NOTES: A fragment of a much larger structure that has partially disappeared which crosses a branch of Wah Umlwai to a river island. The structure once continued from the river island to the opposite bank, but the other portion has fallen. The other portion would have been around twice as long as the remaining section. The remnant primarily consists of two very thick roots, indicating an old structure. The roots are still used occasionally as a bridge. Both are in poor condition, one having partially collapsed. Steps have been created in the side of the bridge by gouging footholds out of the sides of several secondary roots.
NOTE: PLEASE GO TO ANALYTICS AND ANALYSIS (APRIL 2017 DRAFT) FOR METHODOLOGIES. LR PROJECT DESIGNATION DOES NOT REFLECT LOCAL NAME.

DARRANG 1

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RIVER/STREAM: WAH SHENG PNAR
LENGTH: 10.4 m
WIDTH AT CP: 1.7 m
HEIGHT AT CP: 3.2 m
GPS: N25.20516 E92.01889
ALTITUDE: 57 m
SR: 3
NOTES: A small root bridge near Darrang village. The path it serviced has been effectively bypassed by a newly constructed road, and has faded in several spots. Several sections of the bridge have been washed out in floods, and there is significant damage.
NOTE: PLEASE GO TO ANALYTICS AND ANALYSIS (APRIL 2017 DRAFT) FOR METHODOLOGIES. LR PROJECT DESIGNATION DOES NOT REFLECT LOCAL NAME.

 

UMBLAI 1

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RIVER/STREAM: PHUD UMBLAI
GPS: N25.28699 E91.64449
ALTITUDE: 461 m
NOTES: A very large root bridge existed in this location until recently. It was said to have been destroyed in a landslide. Pictured above is a remnant of the span. The replacement bridge, as visible in background of the photo, is 30 m long. The root bridge would have been slightly longer, though also a few meters lower.
NOTE: PLEASE GO TO ANALYTICS AND ANALYSIS (APRIL 2017 DRAFT) FOR METHODOLOGIES. LR PROJECT DESIGNATION DOES NOT REFLECT LOCAL NAME.

MAWSHKEN 1

15 Nongshken 1

RIVER/STREAM: WAH MDON
LENGTH: 16.9 m
WIDTH AT CP: 1.3 m
HEIGHT AT CP: 3.3 m
GPS: N25.28552 E91.77377
ALTITUDE: 739 m
SR: 6
NOTES: This bridge has an unusual, sloping configuration. The tree is leaning out over a cliff. Roots have been trained onto the side of another rock face to keep it from falling off, meaning that the tree is modified in several places that are not part of the bridge. The root bridge remains structurally sound. A 6 SR is given because 1: It shows signs of recent moderate latex extraction cutting and some limited damage due to flooding, and 2: Most of the nearby jungle has been burnt down in shifting cultivation fires. The jungle pictured above is a remnant. Fires were actively burning within a few minutes’ walk. Fire damage and landslide damage are likely in the near future.
NOTE: PLEASE GO TO ANALYTICS AND ANALYSIS (APRIL 2017 DRAFT) FOR METHODOLOGIES. LR PROJECT DESIGNATION DOES NOT REFLECT LOCAL NAME.

KUDENG RIM 7: LIVING ROOT BLEACHERS

11 Kudeng Rim Living Root Bleachers

GPS: N25.23249 E92.03016
ALTITUDE: 640 m
NOTES: Here, a living root platform has been made from a ficus elastica tree next to the Kudeng Rim Village football field. According to sources in Kudeng Rim, the platform came about via a slow and unplanned process in which local children, who would climb the tree to relax and watch football, started winding aerial roots together until the roots bound with one another and formed a functional platform. Over time, as the platform increased in size and strength, more people could both use it, and continue expanding it. They continue to do so to this day. The tree shows considerable latex extraction damage.
NOTE: PLEASE GO TO ANALYTICS AND ANALYSIS (APRIL 2017 DRAFT) FOR METHODOLOGIES. LR PROJECT DESIGNATION DOES NOT REFLECT LOCAL NAME

NONGPRIANG 3

IMG_1505

RIVER/STREAM: WAH UMSHET
LENGTH: 10 m
WIDTH AT CP: .8 m
HEIGHT AT CP: 2.9 m
GPS: N25.27781 E91.74971
ALTITUDE: 495 m
SR: 3
NOTES:
An old living root bridge with thick roots. The river it was grown over changed course about 20 years ago due to a landslide. Now the bridge is only over water when there are flood conditions. The bridge is still structurally sound, but both the span and the tree are badly damaged by severe latex extraction cutting, which was observed to have markedly increased from 2015 to 2016. The Tree does not appear healthy. Village interest in maintenance is limited, as the bridge is usually not necessary to cross the now dry stream bed.
NOTE: PLEASE GO TO ANALYTICS AND ANALYSIS (APRIL 2017 DRAFT) FOR METHODOLOGIES. LR PROJECT DESIGNATION DOES NOT REFLECT LOCAL NAME.

 

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THANGKYRTA 2

IMG_1665

RIVER/STREAM: WAH UMSONG (unconfirmed)
LENGTH: 20.4 m
WIDTH AT CP: 1.5 m
HEIGHT AT CP: 11.3 m
GPS: N25.30624 E91.80693
ALTITUDE: 774 m
SR: 6
NOTES: A living root bridge formed from very large, old, tree. It is a twin span structure, though one span is no longer being used. Measurements were only taken on the span currently in service. The bridge is structurally stable, the roots being well established, however both the tree and the bridge are very badly scarred by numerous latex extraction cuts, many of them recent.  It is next to an old village site. Due to soil depletion, the old village divided up into several different villages occupying various sites nearby, but left the root bridge behind, providing further proof that the bridge is very old.
NOTE: PLEASE GO TO ANALYTICS AND ANALYSIS (APRIL 2017 DRAFT) FOR METHODOLOGIES. LR PROJECT DESIGNATION DOES NOT REFLECT LOCAL NAME.

RANGTHYLLIANG 12

DSCN5799

RIVER/STREAM: WAH PYNURSLA
LENGTH: 52.7 m
WIDTH AT CP: 1 m
HEIGHT AT CP: 4 m
GPS: N25.30359 E91.87199
ALTITUDE: 421 m
SR: 4
NOTES: This exceptional structure is the longest root bridge I’ve visited so far. It consists of two sections, though they are both formed from the same, exceedingly large, ficus elastica tree. In using the bridge, one remains suspended above the ground over a 53-meter distance. The structure also includes a small living root ramp on the northern side of the eastern span. The roots that make up the main elements of the bridge are both very long and very thick, indicating an unusually old structure. As of 2016, the structural soundness of the primary roots appeared to be variable. Several of the roots were still strong and, given their size and, presumably, strength, would be very difficult to dislodge. However, some of the other roots were dead and were rotting, calling into question the health of the tree as a whole. Heavy latex extraction damage was visible in many places on the structure, however none of it looked recent. There is reason to believe that the bridge has been damaged multiple times in floods. It is likely that certain parts of the bridge will fail while others will survive for a significant period of time. The Pynursla river is very polluted in this area, and large amounts of garbage was evident.
NOTE: PLEASE GO TO ANALYTICS AND ANALYSIS (APRIL 2017 DRAFT) FOR METHODOLOGIES. LR PROJECT DESIGNATION DOES NOT REFLECT LOCAL NAME.

RANGTHYLLIANG 8

DSCN0189

RIVER/STREAM: WAH PYNURSLA
LENGTH: LONG SPAN/ SHORT SPAN (see notes) 18.3 m / 6.7 m
WIDTH AT CP: LONG SPAN/SHORT SPAN 1.5 m / 1.7 m
HEIGHT AT CP: LONG SPAN/SHORT SPAN 21.3 m / 4.9 m
GPS: N25.30638 E91.88557
ALTITUDE: 891 m
SR: 7
NOTES: This is a highly unusual living root bridge with two spans arranged at a 90-degree angle, forming an “L” shape. The location of the bridge is unusually scenic, as the longer bridge crosses directly over a 20m waterfall, and there is another 20-30 m waterfall directly behind the bridge. While both spans are stable, not all the roots are well established. Recent maintenance was evident in April 2016. Unfortunately, the Pynursla stream is badly polluted, and much of the shorter span of the root bridge was covered in trash at the time of my last visit.  While it is unclear how much the trash harms the bridge, it greatly diminishes the aesthetic appeal of the bridge itself and of the setting.
NOTE: PLEASE GO TO ANALYTICS AND ANALYSIS (APRIL 2017 DRAFT) FOR METHODOLOGIES. LR PROJECT DESIGNATION DOES NOT REFLECT LOCAL NAME.